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How To Remove Scratches From Glass Furniture

How To Remove Scratches From Glass Furniture

Glass furniture can give your living areas a classy, contemporary look. However like any other material if it is not treated with respect you might end up with some minor issues such as a scratch.

Having a highly polished and reflective surface a scratch on glass may appear more visible than on other dense materials such as timber but the benefits of glass furniture far outweigh the mundane look of other surfaces. See for yourself: –

The simple rule is to ensure when placing articles such as vases, plates, bowls etc on the glass surface you take some basic precautions such as using a pad or cloth below the item. In this way if the item does get dragged or pushed over the surface it will not cause any damage.

If by some quirk of fate you do end up with a scratch then there are a few things you can do to get rid of the annoyance.

As a rule, the heavier the scratch, the trickier it is to remove. But there’s no harm trying – and you may sort lighter scratches with relative ease.

So keep your beautiful glass table tops looking like new with these tips on how to remove scratches from glass.

Just remember it’s not an exact science, so go slow, review how you are getting on regularly, and be prepared to try another route.

Getting rid of light scratches using household products: –

Got some superficial scratches? Run your fingernail over the area, if you can’t feel the groove then the good news is you can probably buff them out with some common household products using these three simple steps: –

  • Clean the surface using glass or window cleaner (you could even use vinegar or lemon juice and a newspaper), then wipe dry with kitchen roll.
  • Gently rub in a metal polish like Brasso (or try a mixture of water, white non gel toothpaste and baking soda), using small circular motions with a soft cloth.
  • Polish to a shine with a soft cloth – and see how you’ve done.

You may need to have several goes at it, so don’t worry if you don’t get the desired result first off.

Top tip: Glass looking ‘foggy’ where you’ve tried to buff out the scratch? Try applying a coat of clear nail polish remover.

Still not happy? It’s time to try something a little more specialised such as: –

Buy a scratch repair product

  1. Try a dedicated scratch repair kit, like Farcela, Glacier and Xerapol, or a set designed for repairing car windscreens or
  1. After a quick win? Try paste wax furniture polish. Apply a thin layer, and it can fill shallow scratches and reflect the light. Once it’s dried, buff with a clean cloth or
  1. Buff out a scratch using a special polishing compound like jeweller’s rouge (cerium oxide). Just remember, you’ll either need plenty of elbow grease, or a polishing pad attachment for a household drill.

 

Minimise deep scratches

If scratches are so deep that you can feel them with your fingertip, the surface is never going to be quite as new. But you can still try specialist glass repair systems like Trizact, which use buffing discs to smooth the surface. Be aware though that to remove the scratch will mean removing the glass around the scratch to the same depth and this can leave a deviation in the surface of the glass.

Once you’ve done all you can, it could be time to just relax and accept how it looks. Other options are calling in the professionals to work their magic, or buying a new glass table top – both potentially pricey options.

Prevention is better than a cure…

Of course, it’s better not to get the scratches in the first place.

Dining tables: You may not fancy covering up your glass with a table cloth – but a table runner can be an attractive addition, while also protecting that gleaming surface. You can use felt, or cork-bottomed coasters and place mats to avoid crashing crockery onto the surface.

Console, side, or dressing tables: Got some decorative pieces which live on the table top? Stick subtle surface-protecting rubber pads to the bottom of items like vases to make sure they don’t leave their mark.

Desks: Make sure your keyboard has rubber feet and use a mouse pad table lamps should have protection on the bottom of the stand.